A R C H I T E C T U R E  
O N  P A P E R

A Collection of Rare Architectural Drawings and Blueprints for Sale or Trade

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ORDER THE BOOK Alfonso Iannelli: Modern By Design here

Well written by David Jameson, owner of Architech Gallery, it documents Iannelli's career with prose, as well as hundreds of images of his drawings, sculpture, and paintings.

  T H E  E M P I R E  S T A T E  B U I L D I N G

    Shreve, Lamb & Harmon, Architect


The most famous building in a city famous for its buildings, the Empire State Building is a quintessential symbol of New York and has become an icon to the world.  The Empire State Building is a 102-story art deco skyscraper located at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street in New York City.  It stood as the world's tallest building for more than forty years, from its completion in 1931, until the World Trade Center's North Tower was completed in 1972. Following the destruction of the World Trade Center in 2001, the Empire State Building is once again the tallest building in New York, and is the third tallest building in the America's surpassed only by the Willis (formerly Sears) Tower and the Trump International Hotel and Tower, both of which are located in Chicago.

The Empire State Building was selected in 1955 by the American Society of Civil Engineers as one of the seven greatest engineering achievements in America's history, and has been billed as the Eighth Wonder of the World.  In 1981, it was designated as a New York City landmark fulfilling all of the qualifications for designation - it has special historical, cultural and aesthetic value, and is an important part of New York's historical and architectural heritage.  In 1986, it was also designated as a National Historic Landmark, and in 2007, it ranked number one on the List of America's Favorite Architecture according to the AIA.

The Empire State Building has appeared in about ninety movies, undoubtedly the most famous being King Kong.  After scaling the building with his blonde love interest, King Kong is shot off the side of the building by a squadron of combat planes, but not before he gently places the hysterically screaming blonde on the rooftop platform.


Who made the first graphic depiction of the Empire State Building depends on who's telling the story, but either John Jacob Raskob (the buildings developer) or William Lamb (architect) pulled out a big pencil and held it skyward.  That, it was decided, was the way the Empire State building should look.  The architects were given a year and nine months in which to design the building and oversee its construction.  This was a monumental task given the scope of the project but was achieved with the intense cooperation of the owners, architects, general contractor and the availability of qualified labor. 

IMAGES


ISOMETRIC 33rd STREET AND 5th AVE. (LOOKING NORTH) 


Pencil on tracing paper
Undated - Circa 1929
11 3/4 x 9 1/4 inches

Provenance:

A private collection
Wright - Important Design

 

 

 

 

 

 


ISOMETRIC 34th STREET AND 5th AVE. (LOOKING SOUTH) 


Pencil on tracing paper 

Undated - Circa 1929

11 3/4 x 9 1/4 inches

Exhibited:
ArchiTech Gallery - Two Centuries: An Architectural Evolution - January 8 through May 29, 2010

Edward Cella Art & Architecture - Drawings and Objects by Architects - August 8 through October 10, 2009


Provenance:

A private collection     
Wright - Important Design

 

 

 

 

 


CROSS SECTION AND LONGITUDINAL SECTION & PLAN OF FLOORS

7 sheets

Plan of Ground Floor

Plan of 2nd to 5th Floors

Plan of 6th to 20th Floors

Plan of 21st to 24th Floors

Plan of 25th to 29th Floors

Plan of 30th to 80th Floors

Cross and Longitudinal Sections

Pencil on tracing paper

Undated - Circa 1930
13 x 10 inches

Exhibited:
ArchiTech Gallery

Provenance:
A private collection  
Wright - Important Design


EAST (5th AVENUE) AND NORTH (34th STREET) ELEVATIONS


Pencil on tracing paper

Numbered P47

Dated January 18, 1930
13 x 14 inches

Provenance:
A private collection   
Wright - Important Design


SCHEME "K" FLOOR PLANS


9 Sheets

-Plan of Ground Floor   (Second Floor Similar) 13 x 22 inches

-Plan of 3rd to 5th floors 13 x 22 inches

-Plan of 6th to 11th floors 13 x 22 inches

-Plan of 12th to 18th floors 13 x 22 inches

-Plan of 19th to 30th floors 13 x 22 inches

-Plan of 31st to 45th floors 16 x 18 inches

-Plan of 46th to 60th floors 16 x 18 inches

-Plan of 61st to 73rd floors 16 x 18 inches

-Plan of 74th to Top 16 x 18 inches

Pencil on tracing paper

Dated October 2 and October 3, 1929

Identified: Work #739

Exhibited:
ArchiTech Gallery - Two Centuries: An Architectural Evolution - January 8, through May 29, 2010
Edward Cella Art & Architecture - Drawings and Objects by Architects -  August 8 through October 10, 2009


Provenance:
A private collection
Wright - Important Design


SCHEME "K" FLOOR PLANS - 1st REVISION
 

11 Sheets

Plan of Basement

Plan of Ground Floor

Plan of 2nd Floor

Plan of 3rd to 5th Floors

Plan of 6th to 21st Floors

Plan of 22nd to 30th Floors

Plan of 31st to 39th Floors

Plan of 40th to 54th Floors

Plan of 55th to 67th Floors

Plan of 68th to 82 Floors

Plan of Bedroom Floors 84th to 92nd

Pencil on tracing paper

Identified: Work Drawings 1-10

Dated October 8, 1929

Size: 13 x 22 inches

Provenance:
A private collection
Wright - Important Design